What are B-Vitamins? A Guide to the Essential B-Vitamin Complex


What is Vitamin B? An A-Z Guide to the Essential B-Vitamin Complex 

What is Vitamin B, and Why Do We Need It? 

Vitamin B is a general term for the entire group of vitamins in the entire “B” complex. The reason we give them the "essential" label, is because humans can't make enough B-Vitamin on our own. Think about it this way; it's "essential" that you eat B-vitamins.

Vitamins are classified according to the material they dissolve in, and accordingly, all the vitamins in the entire B vitamin complex are water-soluble. All vitamins are either fat-soluble or water-soluble.

Although all b vitamins dissolve in water, each has its distinct chemical makeup and can be found in many different types of foods.

When a vitamin is water-soluble, it means that it is expelled out of your body through urination. This means that you must consume B vitamins every day through your diet for your body to be firing on all cylinders. 

B Vitamin Complex

  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)
  • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)
  • Vitamin B3 (Niacin)
  • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)
  • Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
  • Vitamin B7 (Biotin)
  • Vitamin B9 (Folate/Folic Acid)
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Humans need B vitamins for a multitude of reasons, with the most important function being how the B vitamin complex fuels cell metabolism. Simply put, our cells need B vitamins to function correctly.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Thiamine is vital so that humans can adequately use the carbohydrates we eat as “fuel” by turning glucose into ATP. This is why certain people experience great results when supplementing with thiamine regards to energy level, stress levels, and brain clarity. It can also strengthen your immune system. 


Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Riboflavin is used to ensure the continual development of new cells for our skin, digestion tract lining, brain, and blood. In addition to being essential for anybody looking to have amazing skin, Riboflavin has also been shown to reduce migraines by about two attacks per month, and help prevent cataracts. 

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

As a treatment for high cholesterol, at high doses, Niacin is effective in boosting levels of HDL cholesterol (the good kind), and lower triglyceride count in your body. It also contains strong anti-aging properties, Niacin for topical use helps wrinkles and prevents dry skin. 

Niacin helps to boost your good cholesterol – that’s the HDL kind –  which is very important to heart health.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

Vitamin B5 helps humans maintain water in skin cells, helping our skin's elasticity and fighting acne breakouts. It also puts to use proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids to continually repair the largest organ in the body, your skin. 

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

Pyridoxine aids in the regulation of melatonin, aka the “sleep hormone”, and serotonin, the “happy hormone”, to keep us energized during the day and sleepy at night. Since our sleep cycle is such a big factor in heart health, many associate vitamin B6 with heart care. 

Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Biotin is found in many skincare products because of its ability to protect our skin cells from damage and water loss, resulting in a healthy hydrated complexion. It also fights inflammation and fungal infections.

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)

Vitamin B9 is essential to cell turnover and aids in tissue growth. Folic Acid is important for healthy skin cells, and especially crucial for pregnant women, helping to prevent birth defects. 

Vitamin B-12

Works in conjunction with B9 for brain function and the synthesis of red blood cells. B-12 deficiency is not uncommon, often resulting in fatigue. Those who follow strict plant-based diets can be at risk of this and might want to think of alternative sources of B-12, since most humans get their B-12 through animal products. Oat Mama's B Happy B-Vitamin bar has 250% of your daily value, among many other great vitamins and minerals. 


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